ISSUE 107- June 20, 2012

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June 20, 2012
This we welcome the man, the myth, the legend (my Abu Dhabi roomie), Wellington "Megaton" Dias. Megaton will share his positions for 4 weeks starting today, don't blink because this stuff is gold! Also, we are putting together our yearly Immersion seminar up here in "Vacation Land", aka Maine. Save the dates August 28th - September 1st. You won't want to miss this opportunity. We will also be giving away a Limited Edition Origin Gi to all early registration participants. Click on the ad below for more information.

Roll Hard, Roll Often
Pete Roberts, Publisher


This Month's Expert:
Wellington "Megaton" Dias

TECHNIQUE OF THE WEEK
The Leg drag is a staple technique in many top BJJ players repertoire. Megaton demonstrates the perfect way to get into position to pass with the leg drag. He also shows us the small details on how to secure the position and control your opponents hips. This is a great technique that will work for you now!...WATCH NOW >

Wellington Megaton Dias


BJJ Power Play
Andre"Dedeco" Almeda
Dedeco shows us another nice Power Play this week. It's important to anticipate your opponent's movement when applying a technique. In the Power Play, Dedeco works a well known sweep but anticipating his opponent's post he turns his foot down to trap the leg....
WATCH NOW >

Jt Torres vs Pete


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What it Means to be a Black Belt
When I first started training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, over a decade ago, reaching the level of black belt was a goal I had not seriously considered as a possibility. The few black belts I had encountered were so far above my skill level that it seemed inconceivable to me that I could one day reach the same level as them. I just trained and loved learning a new form of self defense that seemed way more practical and efficient than anything I had seen prior. Back then as a brand new white belt, the skills needed for earning a “Faixa-Preta” seemed unobtainable and almost mystical in nature. These guys were larger than life and when they entered a gymnasium or academy, they instantly gained the attention of everyone around. I remember the first time I saw Renzo Gracie walk into a tournament, and the buzz he created amongst all the competitors. Back then, the black belts that I had seen in person were so fluid in their movements, with such a huge base of knowledge and seemingly unbeatable presence on the mats that I never really focused on getting to be as good as they were, I just liked coming in a rolling each day and thought it was cool when I started to learn new moves and positions. I was happy when I could pull of a submission on another white belt. At most I thought that the black belt was an eventual outcome and product of my efforts that would one day just “happen” if I didn’t quit the sport. I suppose that ignorance is bliss as I now know that to earn a black belt requires more than just a solid attendance record at the academy. It takes a combination of practice, patience, perseverance and persistence. Loyalty to the academy, participation in competitions and teaching responsibilities are usually required of a student serious about the art. Access to proper training facilities, serious training partners and legitimate professors to guide you from start to finish will give any student a chance at reaching their goals within the sport. When asked, the majority of jiu jitsu practitioners feel that the rank of black belt is considerably more difficult and longer to reach in our art as compared with many other traditional forms of martial arts, which makes it so much more rewarding when we finally reach our goal of BJJ black belt. I had a student tell me that their former karate instructor had reached the rank of 3rd degree black belt in 4 years. Not to diminish the accomplishments and legitimacy of other martial arts, but the idea of being considered an expert in any field seems to require more than 4 years of training. I look back now at what I was capable of in jiu jitsu after only 4 years and compare it to what I am capable of doing now and it amazes me how far I have progressed. For those who have reached the rank, it is something that we can truly be proud of. Over time I developed a new understanding of what the black belt meant. Its symbolism represents different qualities for different practitioners of the art, but most black belts share a common definition and understanding of what the belt means to them. Back when I first began Jiu Jitsu, I looked... READ NOW >


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